Politics

Here’s what we learned about Trump from passages of Comey’s new book

(FILES) These two file photos show then FBI Director James Comey (L) in Washington, DC, on March 20, 2017; and US President Donald Trump in Washington, DC, on June 6, 2017. Former FBI director James Comey says in a new book that President Donald Trump reminded him of a mafia boss who demanded absolute loyalty, saw the entire world against him, and lied about everything. According to excerpts of the book leaked by US media on Thursday, April 12, 2018, Trump was also obsessed with the alleged existence of a video in which Russian prostitutes said to be hired by Trump urinated on the bed in a Moscow hotel room. In the book to be released officially next Tuesday, April 17, 2018, Comey, whom Trump fired in May 2017, says the US president lives in "a cocoon of alternative reality" that he tried to pull others around him into, according to The Washington Post. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM AND Nicholas KammNICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
Former FBI director James Comey says in a new book that President Donald Trump reminded him of a mafia boss who demanded absolute loyalty, saw the entire world against him, and lied about everything.

Former FBI director James Comey’s 304-page book, coming out Tuesday, promises to share never-before-heard stories about his interactions with President Trump.

In Comey’s book, he describes in great detail the ways in which Trump has allegedly violated the independence of the FBI and attempted to coerce loyalty out of Comey, according to The Washington Post, which obtained a copy of the book, titled “A Higher Royalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership” prior to its release.

In short, he refers to Trump’s presidency as a “forest fire.”

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‘‘What is happening now is not normal,’’ he writes. ‘‘It is not fake news. It is not okay.’’

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Here are a few things we have learned about Trump from passages of Comey’s book:

Trump has denied and made excuses — multiple times — for the details in the “widely circulated” dossier

Comey describes the president’s many attempts at explaining away the dossier that alleges that Russians filmed Trump in 2013 interacting with prostitutes in Moscow.

The infamous dossier has salacious details about the alleged encounter, including a story that Trump had watched as the prostitutes urinated on themselves.

Comey writes that Trump offered several explanations at different times, telling Comey at one point that the story couldn’t be true because, “I’m a germaphobe.”

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Trump later asked Comey what could be done to “lift the cloud” because it was hurting First Lady Melania Trump.

When Comey first brought up the dossier after an intelligence meeting, Trump reportedly interrupted Comey, “asking — rhetorically, I assumed — whether he seemed like a guy who needed the service of prostitutes,” Comey writes.

“He then began discussing cases where women had accused him of sexual assault, a subject I had not raised. He mentioned a number of women, and seemed to have memorized their allegations,” Comey writes.

Trump specifically wanted the public to know that he was not under investigation

Comey writes that Trump asked him to many times to ensure people knew that the FBI was not specifically investigating him.

When Comey explained to Trump that he was not under investigation and that he told Congress that much, Trump responded, “We need to get that fact out,” Comey writes.

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On April 11 — the last time the two men spoke before Comey was fired on May 9 — Trump called Comey to make sure they were going to “get out” that Trump was not under investigation.

‘‘I have been very loyal to you, very loyal,’’ Trump told him, according to the book.

Trump allegedly attempted to coerce Comey into “letting [Michael] Flynn go”

One week after the inauguration, Trump reportedly invited Comey to have dinner with him in the Green Room.

At that dinner, he told Comey, “I need loyalty. I expect loyalty,” Comey writes.

Comey said he replied: “You will always get honesty from me.”

“That’s what I want, honest loyalty,” Trump responded.

In a meeting in February 2017, Trump reportedly asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to leave the Oval Office so Trump could speak with Comey alone about the investigation of former national security advisor Michael Flynn.

‘‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go,’’ Trump said, according to Comey’s account of the meeting, some of which he first shared in Senate testimony last year. ‘‘He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.’’

Comey writes that he told Sessions after that incident that the attorney general couldn’t be “be kicked out of the room so he [Trump] can talk to me alone,” but Sessions “cast his eyes down at the table . . . He said nothing.”

“I read in his posture and face a message that he would not be able to help me,” Comey wrote.

Trump only asked Comey one question the first time they met

Comey said he and Trump first met at the pre-inauguration intelligence briefing, and Trump asked him one question regarding the investigation into Russian interference: “You found there was no impact on the result, right?”

Comey writes that Trump and his advisers did not ask about whether there was any future threat of Russian interference and only seemed to focus on “how they could spin what we’d just told them.”

The Trump team openly discussed emphasizing that the Russian interference had no impact on the election, despite intelligence officials not coming to that conclusion

In that initial meeting, Comey wrote, the Trump team determined that they would emphasize that the Russians had no impact on the 2016 presidential election.

But James Clapper Jr., the director of national intelligence at the time, reminded them that intelligence officials had not yet determined that to be true.

Material from the Washington Post was used in this report. Felicia Gans can be reached at felicia.gans@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @FeliciaGans.