Marijuana

MARIJUANA MOMENT

Vermont bill to legalize marijuana sales moves to House

FILE -- A worker tends to marijuana plants at Canopy Growth Corporation's Tweed facility in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, Sept. 21, 2018. Martha Stewart, the doyenne of domesticity, will advise the Canadian company on a new line of hemp-based CBD products for animals and humans. (Dave Chan/The New York Times)
Dave Chan/The New York Times
A worker tends to marijuana plants at Canopy Growth Corporation's Tweed facility in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, in September 2018.

Marijuana Moment is a wire service assembled by Tom Angell, a marijuana legalization activist and journalist covering marijuana reform nationwide. The views expressed by Angell or Marijuana Moment are neither endorsed by the Globe nor do they reflect the Globe’s views on any subject area.

As Vermont’s legislature resumes following last week’s recess, key committees and lawmakers are putting renewed focus on legislation to tax and regulate marijuana sales for adults.

The state Senate gave veto-proof approval to S. 54 earlier this month. Now the proposal goes to the House for consideration, but the larger legislative body isn’t going to rush into a floor vote right away; it still has other bills to evaluate before it can take up legislation “crossing over” from the Senate.

“The House has a tendency to go through things with a fine-tooth comb,” Representative Sam Young told Marijuana Moment in an interview. “It’s just the nature of the House. We’ve never taken testimony on tax and regulate either.”

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“The Senate’s done it several times, but not in the House,” he said. “I believe the support is there, we’ve just got to do the work and fine-tune some stuff.”

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The Senate-passed legislation would impose a 16 percent excise tax on sales along with a two percent local option tax for towns that levee the fee. The bill provides for the creation of a three-person Cannabis Control Board that would issue licenses and regulate the marijuana economy. Officials have projected a range of $3.8 million to $7.4 million in revenue in the first fiscal year, with the expected haul rising to as much as $16.6 million by 2024.

The bill has not yet been assigned to a committee by House Speaker Mitzi Johnson, though Representative Sarah Copeland-Hanzas said it is likely to come before the House Committee on Government Operations, which she chairs.

“It could reside in my committee the entire time and I could ask for input from the Judiciary, Agriculture, General and probably the Human Services committees as well,” she said.

Copeland-Hanzas said she’ll also likely end up needing additional panels to consult on the bill.

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Under the legislation as it stands, licenses for cultivators and testing labs would be issued between September and October of 2020. Retailers would receive licenses in spring 2021.

Vermont became the first state to legalize marijuana by legislative action — as opposed to via a voter initiative — in 2018, but it left out any provision to allow its sale. The Senate has passed legislation to legalize and regulate cannabis sales multiple times in the past, but the larger House, where S. 54 sits now, has failed to adopt similar proposals.

While the current bill’s path through the House remains to be seen, proponents say newly expanded Democratic and Progressive majorities in both chambers will play to their favor.

“The fact that we have separated the question of whether or not we have marijuana legal for adult consumption from the question of whether or not we have retail sales does make a difference to a lot of people,” Copeland-Hanzas said.

Dave Silberman, an attorney and pro bono drug policy reform advocate, said he was looking forward to hearing testimony in the House.

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“My sense is the reason that tax and regulate votes have failed in the House in the past is because there have been no substantive committee hearings on tax and regulate,” he said. “In order to get big policy done, a lot of people just feel like the process is very important and folks who are sympathetic toward tax and regulate, who are supportive of tax and regulate, have held back because of that lack of process.”

“What’s different this year is that the speaker has publicly stated that we are going to get multiple committees involved with the process this year, and I think that’s a huge step this year,” he added. “It’s something I’ve been begging for for the past three years.”

Although she has committed to holding hearings on the issue, Johnson has also said she’s unconvinced the state is ready for taxed and regulated sales.

“You know, I’m honestly really torn on it,” she told Vermont Public Radio in January.

The House’s Committee on General, Housing, and Military Affairs is holding on to H. 196, a separate tax and regulate bill, authored and introduced by Young and cosponsored by more than a third of the House’s membership. In his legislation, existing dispensaries, which currently only serve patients on the state’s medical marijuana registry, could pay a $75,000 fee to start recreational sales to the public next year.

Those collected funds would be used to offset the costs of setting up the Cannabis Control Board. Senate leaders opted to not include a similar measure in their bill, saying it would create an unfair advantage for the current providers.

“I think it could be helpful in front-loading some of the revenue that we need,” Copeland-Hanzas said. “This is really all about consumer protection, and it’s hard to imagine where in a small state we’re going to find a bunch of budgetary dollars to do that.”

Other details the House will have to grapple with include the rate at which sales are taxed, funds for education and prevention efforts, and the number of positions on the Cannabis Control Board, which had dropped from five to three positions in the final version of the Senate’s bill.

Governor Phil Scott, who reluctantly signed legislation to legalize low-level marijuana possession and home cultivation last year, has said he would be unwilling to sign a bill to tax and regulate sales unless public safety initiatives, including roadside testing, are funded as well.

“To be very direct: There must be comprehensive and convincing plans completed in these areas before I will begin to consider the wisdom of implementing a commercial ‘tax and regulate’ system for an adult marijuana market,” he said last year prior to signing the previous bill.

Young said he’s aware of Scott’s demands.

“We need to work it out with the governor because we’re going to need a signature,” he said. “Without it, all the effort is for nothing.”

Read this story on Marijuana Moment.