Latest Obituaries headlines

Azzedine Alaïa, 82, fashion’s most independent designer

Mr. Alaïa’s clothes were worn by women from Michelle Obama to Lady Gaga.

Jana Novotna, Winner of Wimbledon, Dies at 49

Jana Novotna, the Czech tennis star who famously cried on the Duchess of Kent’s shoulder after losing a Wimbledon singles final in 1993 and then triumphed at the same tournament five years later, died Sunday in the Czech Republic. She was 49.

Dr. John T. Harrington, former dean of Tufts University School of Medicine, dies at 80

Dr. John T. Harrington, 80, of West Roxbury, who died Oct. 31, formerly was dean of Tufts University School of Medicine.

Edward Herman, media critic who co-wrote ‘Manufacturing Consent,’ dies at 92

Edward Herman, media critic who co-wrote ‘Manufacturing Consent,’ dies at 92.

Charles Manson dead at 83

Of the 20th century’s most notorious murderers, Mr. Manson was very likely the most culturally persistent and perhaps also the most inscrutable.

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Ms. Reese sang the theme song to “Touched by an Angel,’’ in which she played a stern but loving supervisor of angels.

Della Reese, singer and actress who starred on ‘Touched by an Angel,’ dies at 86

The husky-voiced singer and actress spent almost a decade playing a down-to-earth heavenly messenger on the CBS series.

Mrs. Hill’s efforts drew criticism from residents and tourists who liked the convenience of buying single-serving water bottles.

Jean Hill, who led Concord’s plastic bottle-ban effort, dies at 90

Jean Hill, who died Nov. 5, led Concord’s successful effort to ban the sale of single-serving plastic water bottles.

Mr. Tillis’s resonant baritone was suited to both traditional country and pop-leaning material.

Mel Tillis, 85, country star known for his songs and his stutter

Mr. Tillis wrote such hits as “Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town” on his way to the Country Music Hall of Fame.

From left, Mr. Segura, Bobby Riggs, Dinny Pails, and Jack Kramer leaped a net at an indoor court in New York City in 1947 as they prepared for matches.

Pancho Segura, 96, tennis great and mentor to Jimmy Connors

Mr. Segura surmounted a sickly and impoverished childhood in Ecuador to become one of the world’s leading tennis players in the mid-20th century.

Mr. Millet founded the school’s squash program.

Francis Davis Millet, 100, influential Milton Academy teacher

Mr. Millet was a mentor for generations of students at the school, where he had taught and lived since he was hired 75 years ago.

Ferdie Pacheco and his wife, Lusita, with heavyweight champ Muhammad Ali. Pacheco called Ali “the greatest of all time.”

Ferdie Pacheco, 89, ‘fight doctor’ for Muhammad Ali

Mr. Pacheco was a boxing presence for four decades as the physician in Muhammad Ali’s corner and later a ringside TV analyst.

John Raines, 84; was accomplice in 1971 burglary that revealed FBI abuses

Dr. Raines, his wife, and six others broke into an FBI office in suburban Philadelphia and later distributed the documents to media outlets.

Malcolm Young, second from left, performed with AC/DC in Munich in 2003. Also on stage were Brian Johnson, Phil Rudd, Angus Young, and Cliff Williams.

AC/DC founding member Malcolm Young dies at 64

Mr. Young was the rhythm guitarist and guiding force behind the legendary Australian band.

Mr. Riina was one of Sicily’s most notorious Mafia bosses.

Toto Riina, 87, Mafia ‘boss of bosses’

Mr. Riina was serving 26 life sentences as the mastermind of a bloody strategy to assassinate rivals and Italian prosecutors and law enforcement.

Uwe Reinhardt with Princeton University students at the the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs in the late 1970s.

Uwe Reinhardt, 80, seminal voice on health care policy

Mr. Reinhardt’s keen, caustic, and unconventional insights cast him as a national conscience in policy debates about health care.

Paul Buckmaster.

Paul Buckmaster, 71, arranger on hits among wide range of genres

Mr. Buckmaster’s work brought power and poignancy to signature songs by David Bowie, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Carly Simon, and many others.

Uwe Reinhardt, 80, seminal voice on health care policy

Mr. Reinhardt’s keen, caustic, and unconventional insights cast him as a national conscience in policy debates about health care.

Patrick Nagatani; nuclear legacy haunted his images

Mr. Nagatani devoted his photographic career to evoking the nuclear legacy of the adopted nation that interned his parents during World War II.

Debra Chasnoff, 60; won Oscar for documentary

Debra Chasnoff was an Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker whose work highlighted gay families.

Jerry Ellis, the master of merchandise mayhem, died at home Saturday of vascular ailments.

Jerry Ellis dies at 90

Jerry Ellis, Building 19’s purveyor ‘Good stuff cheap,’ dies at 90

Mr. Ellis filled his stores with unusual goods culled from manufacturer’s closeouts, overstock, and bankruptcies.

Manuel

Manuel ‘Jungle Jim’ Rivera, 96, speedy White Sox hitter

Mr. Rivera earned his nickname from a Chicago sportswriter, in a nod to how he played the game with abandon.

France's David Poisson holding his bronze medal during the medal ceremony after the men's downhill event of the 2013 Ski World Championships in Schladming, Austria.

David Poisson, 35; was French downhillskier

Mr. Poisson won the downhill bronze medal at the 2013 world championships.

Dead Moon, including Mr. Cole, played in August 2015 in Santa Ana, Calif.

Fred Cole, 69, leader of garage-rockers Dead Moon

With Dead Moon and various other groups, Mr. Cole set a standard for do-it-yourself perseverance.

Thomas J. Hudner Jr. saluted in 2012 at a ceremony in Charlestown celebrating the naming of a ship after him.

Thomas J. Hudner Jr., 93, war hero and veterans’ affairs commissioner

Mr. Hudner, a Medal of Honor recipient, went on to lead the state Department of Veterans’s Services for much of the 1990s.

At her peak in the 1980s and 1990s, Liz Smith’s eponymous syndicated column ran in more than 70 newspapers. She publicly feuded with the likes of Donald Trump and Frank Sinatra.

Liz Smith, 94; gossip columnist dished on the boldfaced-name set

For more than a quarter-century, Ms. Smith’s was one of the most widely read in the world.

General Cushman received multiple battlefield commendations for heroism during the Vietnam War.

John H. Cushman, 96, Army general who brought new flexibility to military planning

General Cushman received multiple battlefield commendations for heroism during the Vietnam War.

Building #19 founder Gerald Elovitz, a.k.a. Jerry Ellis, at his chain’s Weymouth store in 2013.

obituary

Gerald Elovitz, co-founder of Building #19, dies at age 90

For nearly a half-century, Elovitz’s Building #19 stores gave penny-pinching New Englanders a reason to smile.

At her peak in the 1980s and 1990s, Liz Smith’s eponymous syndicated column ran in more than 70 newspapers. She publicly feuded with the likes of Donald Trump and Frank Sinatra.

Liz Smith, 94; gossip columnist dished on the boldfaced-name set

For more than a quarter-century, Ms. Smith’s was one of the most widely read in the world.

Vanu Bose, 52, noted figure with MIT and cellular pioneer

Born into one of Greater Boston’s most prominent technology families, Mr. Bose became an entrepreneur in his own right.

Katie Lee, 98, fiery folk singer who fought to protect a canyon

Ms. Lee found her mission as a performer and writer protesting the loss of Glen Canyon’s spectacular beauty to a dam on the Colorado River.

Mr. De Cormier played a leading — if largely invisible — role in the folk revival of the 1950s and ’60s.

Robert De Cormier, 95, singer and arranger who bridged classical and folk

Mr. De Cormier arranged politically progressive songs for artists such as Pete Seeger and Paul Robeson, sometimes accompanying them with his voice or guitar.

Gilbert Rogin, 87, magazine editor and writer of droll fiction

Mr. Rogin served as a top editor at Sports Illustrated and other magazines.

Arjay Miller at his 1979 retirement from Stanford Graduate School of Business. He was being serenaded by a student band called the Arjays.

Arjay Miller, 101; former Harvard student led a resurgence at Ford

Mr. Miller modernized Ford’s management and marketed the original Mustangs.

Mr. Abrams, pictured here at a 2010 solo performance, was known for his diverse compositions and improvisations.

Muhal Richard Abrams, 87, idiosyncratic pianist and composer

Mr. Abrams also was known for his helping to found a long-running Chicago-based musicians’ collective.

“Velma will be remembered as a woman for whom no task was too small and no issue too big to tackle,” Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh wrote in a letter to her children.

Velma Haith, 72; served youths at Dorchester community center

Mrs. Haith was a program supervisor and a second mother to generations of youths at the Lee School community center in Dorchester.

Ms. Friday’s books about gender politics helped redefine American women’s sexuality and social identity in the late 20th century. Above: Ms. Friday at her home in Washington.

Nancy Friday, 84, bestselling student of gender politics

Ms. Friday’s books about gender politics helped redefine American women’s sexuality and social identity in the late 20th century.

Mildred Roberts from when she served in the Women's Army Corps.

Midi Roberts, recognized for alumni efforts at University of Maine, dies at 94

Mrs. Roberts started the women’s basketball team and helped create the women’s intramural sports program during her time in Orono.

Astronaut Richard Gordon Jr. Gordon, one of a dozen men who flew around the moon but didn't land there.

Apollo 12 astronaut Richard Gordon, who circled moon, dies

Richard Gordon undertook what became a harrowing and abortive spacewalk in a 1966 NASA mission.

Pitcher Roy Halladay, 40, known for grit on ballfield, graciousness off it

The retired pitcher, who starred for the Toronto Blue Jays and the Philadelphia Phillies, died on Tuesday when his plane crashed in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida.

Linda Nochlin, 86, feminist art historian, writer

Linda Nochlin was a celebrated art historian whose feminist approach permanently altered her field.

Watertown Fire Chief Mario A. Orangio (left) and Watertown Police Chief Edward P. Deveau (right) during a ceremony. Orangio died from cancer on Tuesday.

Retired Watertown fire Chief Mario Orangio dies

Mr. Orangio was appointed fire chief in 2004 at the age of 37, making him the youngest in the town’s history.

Even into her 70s, Susan Phelps remained a vibrant figure in the fashion and social scenes of Cambridge’s underground.

Owner of Hubba Hubba, friend to many, leaves a hole in Cambridge

Ms. Phelps, who died Saturday at 79, was especially a generous listener, adept at making all kinds of people feel comfortable with who they were or wanted to be.

Tom Mathews served in the Kennedy administration and went on to build a direct-mail operation that raised millions for a variety of progressive causes.

Tom Mathews, 96, promoter of liberal causes and candidates

Mr. Mathews worked on multiple presidential campaigns, including those of Robert Kennedy and John Anderson.

Rev. West served as the Unitarian Universalist Association’s president from 1969-1977.

Robert Nelson West, 88; led Unitarians through challenging times

Unitarian Universalist Association officials credited the Rev. West, who served as president from 1969-1977, with ensuring that the UUA dodged bankruptcy.

Jane Juska’s widely read 2003 memoir, ‘‘A Round-Heeled Woman: My Late-Life Adventures in Sex and Romance,’’ detailed her late-life trysts.

Jane Juska, 84, memoirist of later-life encounters

Ms. Juska wrote ‘‘A Round-Heeled Woman: My Late-Life Adventures in Sex and Romance.’’

Mr. Flanagan was a Vermont state senator and auditor of accounts.

Ed Flanagan, 66, first openly gay lawmaker elected to statewide office in US

Mr. Flanagan served as Vermont auditor of accounts and state senator.

Mr. Beckey, ascending Clyde Palisade, Firebird Ridge in Sierra Nevada, in the 1970s.

Fred Beckey, conqueror and chronicler of North American peaks; at 94

Mr. Beckey was the first to take hundreds of routes to the summits of North America’s tallest peaks over a seven-decade climbing career.

“I want the best I can get, no matter what,’’ said Mr. Segal, who became a significant force in Boston’s art world.

Thomas Segal, 77; brought famous art to his Newbury Street gallery

Mr. Segal was an art dealer who combined refined tastes and a sharp business background.