Metro

Adrianne Haslet not giving up on running Boston Marathon after getting hit by car

Globe Staff/File

Adrianne Haslet, the dancer who lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombings and became a symbol of resiliency, hasn’t given up on running in this year’s race, despite getting hit by a car over the weekend in a Back Bay crash that left her seriously injured.

Haslet, who’s being treated at Boston Medical Center, addressed Wednesday night whether she’ll be able to participate in the April marathon following the devastating crash Saturday. She initially announced in October that she planned to run the marathon.

“I don’t know if I’m cleared to run this year, but until then, my head is staying in the game,” Haslet wrote on Instagram.

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She also posted a photo of herself smiling in her hospital bed and making a heart symbol with her hands, in reference to the Heartbreak Hill Running Company team she’s been training with.

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“I’ve been through worse,” Haslet wrote. “I can get through this throbbing pain, this deep anger, this hurdle. A year ago today I joined the @heartbreakersrun and have become a faster runner and have had more fun than I ever dreamed. I learned how to run in my new leg. I smashed so many goals as a result. My goals aren’t changing. It’s only my path to get to those goals that has taken a detour. Armed with a determination I never thought could get stronger, and your words, love, and support to do so will only make crossing that finish line even sweeter.”

Haslet was struck by a car Saturday evening near 311 Commonwealth Ave., and the driver, a Marlborough man in his 20s who remained at the scene, told police he couldn’t see Haslet because of the rainy weather and her dark clothing, records show.

The man, whose name was redacted in an incident report provided by Boston police, was cited for failing to stop for a pedestrian in a marked crosswalk, an infraction that carries a maximum fine of $200.

Earlier this week, famed long-distance swimmer and journalist Diana Nyad, a friend of Haslet’s, wrote about Haslet’s ordeal in a separate Instagram post.

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“Adrianne went through hours of surgery whereby the med team inserted a number of plates and screws into her shattered left shoulder and elbow,” Nyad wrote. “She is now listed in ‘fair condition’ but I spoke to Adrianne right out of the OR and she said this trauma, dragging her back to the unspeakable event of 2013, has rocked her to the core. The shoulder is a tricky joint to start with and now she faces another long haul of rehab toward full recovery.”

Haslet lost part of her leg during the April 15, 2013, bombings, which killed three people and wounded hundreds more. The perpetrators also killed an MIT police officer while they were on the run.

After Haslet’s amputation, she continued to dance and even appeared on “Dancing with the Stars.”

She describes herself as an advocate for amputee rights, keynote speaker, ballroom dancer, and blade runner on her Instagram profile.

On Thursday, Haslet posted another photo to Instagram, this time of her smiling while holding up Nike running shoes with flowers in them.

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“Thank you @Nike for your support and love, and your sweet note,” Haslet wrote. “I can’t think of a better vase than a fresh pair of kicks. Especially for these sick Vaporfly 4% Flyknits! I’ll be rocking these on my first run back, I can’t wait to get a timeline and start counting down the days until then. Today I got dressed and put on my team’s hat, it made me happy to look forward instead of backward.”

She added that the days following the crash haven’t been easy.

“The emotional roller coaster that comes with the stages of grieving is not new to me, but it still makes me suddenly burst out sobbing,” Haslet wrote. “I’m done with surgery — for now. But I have a long road ahead. I can’t move certain parts of my body, I can’t put my leg on (it received the first hit of the car) and I’m bruised and swollen all over. Some moments I focus on all of the ways it hurts, but I try to focus on all the ways it could have been so much worse. One thing I know for sure? This isn’t how my story will end.”

Globe Correspondent Maddie Kilgannon contributed to this report. Travis Andersen can be reached at travis.andersen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @TAGlobe.