Metro

WEEK AHEAD

Brookline could remove slave owner’s name from school

Brookline Town Meeting this week will consider renaming the Edward Devotion Elementary School (rear), named for a former slave owner who bequeathed land to the town for use as a school.
Globe Staff/File
Brookline Town Meeting this week will consider renaming the Edward Devotion Elementary School (rear), named for a former slave owner who bequeathed land to the town for use as a school.

Should the name of an 18th-century slave owner — and town benefactor — be removed from a Brookline public school?

Residents will take up the question when Town Meeting gets underway Tuesday. The Edward Devotion School, named for a long-ago resident who bequeathed land to the town for use as a school, is undergoing a $120 million renovation.

Along with the upgrade, proponents argue, the K-8 school should get a new name.

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“Holding a slaveholder up as a beacon of virtue to young people sends the wrong message to our youth, people of color, allies, and the broader Brookline community,” Deborah Brown and Anne Greenwald wrote in Town Meeting filings. Among the assets Devotion listed in his will before his death in 1744 was “1 Negrow.”

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Their warrant article proposes that the school be renamed for Roland B. Hayes, a renowned African-American musician who lived in Brookline, “or other appropriate name consistent with 21st-century values and the Town’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.” Town Meeting starts at 7 p.m. in the high school auditorium.

Attention a cappella fans! Make your way to Rockport on Friday to hear the group Naturally 7 mix rich harmonies with an amazing ability to mimic instruments in “vocal play.” The performance starts at 8 p.m. at the Shalin Liu Performance Center, 37 Main St. For information and tickets, call 978-546-7391 or visit rockportmusic.org.

Traditional dances, craft-making, educational talks, and games for children highlight the 25th annual Spring Planting Moon Pow-Wow in Marshfield this weekend. The two-day event is presented by the Massachusetts Center for Native American Awareness. It takes place Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Marshfield Fairgrounds, 140 Main St. Admission is $5, $4 seniors, $3 children. For more information, go to www.mcnaa.org.

Women’s roles during World War II will be explored in a new exhibit opening Friday at the International Museum of World War II in Natick. “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” will feature more than 100 artifacts, documents, and uniforms from countries around the world. The museum at 8 Mercer Rd. will also display, for the first time, a series of Ansel Adams photographs that document the role of women as part of the war effort in Massachusetts. For more information, call 508-651-1944 or go to museumofworldwarii.org.

Leslie Anderson can be reached at leslie.anderson@globe.com.