Magazine
    Next Score View the next score

    Style Watch

    Peach walls and pink accents brighten up a girl’s bedroom

    Warm, bright colors and fun patterns make a sweet retreat in Wellesley.

    Michael J. Lee

    As the mother of four, Elizabeth Benedict of Elizabeth Home Decor & Design in Chestnut Hill is as adept at mediation as she is at mixing color and pattern. So when a project in Wellesley hit a bump — the client’s 5-year-old daughter wasn’t happy with the plan to paint her bedroom pink — Benedict didn’t bat an eye. Rather than abandon the vibrant fabrics already selected, she threw even more pattern into the mix and proposed a saturated peachy hue for the walls. “There’s a continuity of color, but we play with size and texture,” she says. “You can put as many patterns in a room as you want, as long as they vary in scale.”

    1. The pattern of the Robert Allen Lattice Bamboo fabric in the Roman shades plays off the textural patterning of the ceramic garden stool used as a side table next to the chair.

    2. A swivel rocker made sense for storytime. The Duralee Sedgewick fabric, in a lively ikat pattern that incorporates the colors used in the room, was the starting point for the overall design.

    Advertisement

    3. The bold headboard fabric, Kravet Cumulus by Diane Von Furstenberg, anchors the bed, which is the room’s focal point. Custom pillows and the cushion on the chest, covered in China Seas Nitik II fabric, add another layer of pattern.

    Get Today's Headlines in your inbox:
    The day's top stories delivered every morning.
    Thank you for signing up! Sign up for more newsletters here

    4. The orange mat sets off the needlepoint lion, which the homeowner’s mom stitched in 1971.

    5. “The paint color, Benjamin Moore’s Hugs & Kisses, while not pink, is still very girly,” Benedict says. “It makes a statement but allows the textiles to pop.”

    6. The Worlds Away floral pendant light, made from capiz shells, has a quiet femininity and provides a burst of color against the ceiling. “A chandelier would have been too over the top,” Benedict says.